Leadership Wisdom from My Readers (Pt. 9)

Leadership Wisdom

This series is about sharing the knowledge, thoughts, and wisdom of those who comment on my blog. I’d recommend checking out Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5,  Part 6, Part 7, and Part 8 Below is more leadership wisdom from my readers. I hope you enjoy:

Ludvig Sunström from StartGainingMomentum.com

“I’ve been thinking about positive vs negative external influences a lot lately. One thing I’ve been doing — practicing — for the past two months is to focus on all the good things in my life, focus on gratitude/appreciation. Because, as corny as it sounds, it’s mostly the “small” things in life that give the most pleasure. But since we’re used to doing or getting those things we tend not to appreciate them — at least that’s true for me. Meditation and working out are also good (and natural) ways that I like for being positive.”

“It think it’s important to have at least a bit of balance in life, but at the same time I absolutely do not want to compromise my main 1-3 goals. It’s very hard to maintain a high skill level in more than 1-3 things for me.”

“Here’s how I spark my thinking: 1. I think about specific questions and try to keep focused on that question until I have solved it. This is harder than it sounds like, because the mind tends to want to think about something else if it cannot immediately answer a question. 2. I meditate and stop thinking on purpose. Just as with your walks, I find myself having ideas pop up then. 3. I read good books and get ideas from that.”

Tom Dixon from the TomDixon.com

“I’m reading (or rather listening to while I am on the treadmill) To Sell Is Human, and the author describes an interesting technique to prompt others to find their why. Ask the other person to rank themselves on a scale of 1 to 10, and then ask why it isn’t lower. In other words – if you are a 5, why are you at a 5 and not letting it slide to a 2 or 3. That clarifies the reasons why the goal is worthwhile. Anyway, I thought it applied nicely to personal growth.”

“I try to leave others better off than I left them. This means adding value in the conversation, going above and beyond what they expect, and genuinely caring about them on a personal level. I’d rather have an above average performer with a great attitude than a stellar performer with a bad attitude…but that is just me.”

“Catch people doing something right. If the feedback is negative, give it right away – don’t wait for a performance appraisal or the next one on one.”

Bernard Haynes from LeadtoImpact.com

“I have three friends I talk to weekly. They have greatly strengthened my life. I can share with them intimate details of my life and I can trust it to stay with them. It is a tremendous blessing to have them walk along with me through the good, bad and ugly things of life. They have been there not just to push to get to go forward, but they listen and encourage me where I am at the moment. I thank God for them and others.”

“I believe there are two types of fear. The normal fear that we experience when encountering some occurrence in our life. Then there is the spirit of fear. The spirit of fear is that crippling fear that causes you to hide from your responsibilities. It holds you hostage from living and leading your best life. It keeps you from realizing your true leadership position. You overcome the spirit of fear by focusing on your assignment, linking up with encouraging people, letting go of the past and doing it afraid.”

Question: Which of the above comments resonated with you the most?

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  • DS

    Catch people doing something right is a critical lesson I learned while reading “Helping People Win at Work” by Ken Blanchard and Garry Ridge (http://www.kenblanchard.com/helppeoplewinatwork/). People will respond in ways you’ve never imagined as you help them celebrate doing things right.

    • That’s crucial, thank you for the book recommendation.

  • Great recap of men who understand how a man should lead. Dr. Lee Robinson, now gone to heaven, always said, it rises and fall with leadership, and aren’t we seeing that fall in our country as I type this. As a woman I have purposed in my heart to challenge women to be courageous and wise with how they live life here on earth. As one of the older women the bible talks about I need to put forth the effort to teach the younger ones, make it my goal, my project, my mission, to speak boldly and live out what I speak boldly about. Which is why Bernard comment speaks to me, it takes courage to face the fears in our life and step up to the high calling of God. Merry Christmas brother.

    • Hi Betty,

      Leading a life of wisdom is crucial. Thank you for adding to the topic. I always enjoy reading your comments.

  • Thanks for the feature, Dan! :)

    • My pleasure, thank you for always adding such great insights to the comment section.

  • These are all great, Dan. I love hearing what others have to say about growth. Not only does it help me by giving me good ideas, it also helps me with the camaraderie of knowing that we’re all working on it together.

    • Me too! It’s valuable. Thank you for reading and sharing.

  • Bernard’s comment about the value of friendship stuck out to me. Community is something that God is showing me more and more that I need.

    • I agree, it was a great comment. Community is so essential for our faith walk. Thank you for adding to the discussion.